Posts Tagged “Resort”

Confucius said it best, “Choose a job you love, and you will never work a day in your life.” This is a motto that we should all live by, because enjoying life is what it is all about. When you think about your job, do you dread it? Or do you go to sleep at night excited about work? If you want a job that will make you smile, then consider becoming a ski instructor.

Each fall, American ski resorts are inundated with young college graduates eager to make a final splash before heading off to the corporate world by working a variety of winter jobs – all to sustain more days skiing in one season than most skiers experience in a lifetime. Could this be the right move for you? If yes, then you’re in luck because there are more ski resort jobs than applicants!

Working in Japan can lead to great experiences, new friendships, and a new found appreciation for a culture that one may not have understood completely. There are many employment opportunities to be found and the pay scale for each varies depending on the type of work. If you’re thrifty, it is possible to save anywhere from forty thousand yen per month to above two hundred thousand yen per month depending on the type of work that you are doing.

Ask anyone why they would want a ski job and the first reason that they offer probably centers on days of plunging through waist-deep powder followed by the raucous night life. But, would it surprise you to learn that many people move to ski resorts for the summer?

Once upon a time, ski resorts operated solely for the winter ski season. While it’s still true that most winter resorts make over 70% of their revenue during the five or six winter months, they’ve also discovered how many visitors return to enjoy the warm summer breezes, fields of wildflowers and endless opportunities for summer recreation. But how do you find a summer job at a ski resort?

Although many owners today are trying to get out of their timeshare contracts and have a negative perception about such vacationing option, it is no doubt that this industry have a significant on the society. It is important to note that the timeshare industry is multifaceted. Just like the lodging industry, the impacts are direct such as the money for construction, the actual purchase of the product, employment at the actual resort, and taxes; and indirect such as businesses needed to support the resort, employment opportunities created by the need, money spent at the businesses by vacation owners and guests, and the taxes on the money that is collected.

When you think about working at a ski resort, does the word “liftie” first come to mind? Nothing wrong with being a lift attendant, but you may be looking for more of a full-time year- round professional career. The seasonal hourly jobs which are most visible at a ski resort are perfect for some, but many professional opportunities exist as well that keep local mountain residents happily employed, year after year. Ski resort jobs can be broken down into three categories; seasonal, full-time seasonal or full-time year-round.

Seasonal Jobs

There are three kinds of management involved with resorts: Front-of-House Management, Heart-of-House Management I, and Heart-of-House Management II. Heart-of-House Management refers to managing the resort areas that support front-of-house operations. This type of management deals with the physical plant, grounds, energy, accounting, and purchasing functions of a resort hotel. These support areas are critical to the successful operation of a resort hotel, but great care is taken to keep the guests from seeing this aspect of the facility to ensure higher levels of guest satisfaction.

Tourism and commercial recreation is over an $800 billion industry in the United States. Globally, tourism accounts for approximately 12% of the Gross Domestic Product, employing 10% of the worldwide labor force. It is estimated that by the year 2020, more than half of all employed people in the world will be involved directly or indirectly with the tourism industry. In the United States, travel-related tourism is the first, second or third largest employer in 32 states.

Just because spas offer its customers full relaxation and respite from the daily stress and hustle and bustle of the metropolis, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the people working behind it are on Zen mode 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In fact, managing a spa or taking on a spa career comes with as many guidelines and technicalities as the average Windows operating system. While it may seem odd that we compare something deemed stress-relieving to something a little stress-inducing, this is the reality. A spa is considered a place for rest, but this only applies to the customer. For the people behind it, a spa is busy one-way street.

Due to the continuous growing demand for physical beauty and an extravagant lifestyle, job vacancies in spas and resorts are increasing dramatically. Although no basic qualifications are necessary to enter in this profession, a formal training program will help you to acquire a better pay and position. There are numerous job opportunities available in this field, ranging from manicurist -pedicurists specialists to masseurs and therapists to cosmetologists.